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Aqdot wins at the 2013 European Venture Competition

 

Climate-KIC’s annual Innovation Festival was held this year in Wroclaw, Poland. A total of 13 start-ups were judged by a panel of investors and representatives from industry as well as the hundreds of climate innovators in the audience who voted for their favorite start-up by sending a text message.

Aqdot was awarded the second prize of €20.000 in the European Finals of Climate-KIC’s 2013 Venture Competition.

Aqdot, a Cambridge-based company, pitched technology that allows for an energy efficient way of manufacturing microcapsules while reducing the usage of raw materials, leading to lower energy consumption and less waste.

Switzland-based OsmoBlue has won the €40.000 first prize and Netherland-based Pectocof were awarded €20,000 in a joint second prize as an Italian start-up picked up the audience award.

More information can be found on Climate-KIC.

Aqdot wins Climate-UK Venture Competition

At a pitching session and awards ceremony in London on 2 September, Climate-KIC UK has announced the two winning start-ups – Econic Technologies and Aqdot – in the UK rounds of Climate-KIC’s Venture Competition.

Aqdot‘s technology allows for an energy- and raw material-efficient way of manufacturing microcapsules, leading to lower energy consumption and less waste.

Potential applications include encapsulating enzymes in laundry detergents, or encapsulating fertilisers in the agrochemical sector. Microencapsulation is a multi-billion-per-annum industry with established applications in household and personal care, food and agrochemical markets.

Winners receive a grant of €20.000 and a spot in the European finals. The event took place at the Royal College of Music’s Britten Theatre in South Kensington.

The winners were selected by a jury made up of Craig Lucas, Head of Innovation and Engineering at the UK’s Department of Energy and Climate Change; Akira Kirton, Venturing Principle EMEI at BP; Kelsey Lynn, Director Technology Ventures at Touchstone Innovations and Jonathan Tyler, Chief Commercial Officer, Climate-KIC.

More information can be found on Climate-KIC.

Business Weekly: Ones to watch: Aqdot

Business Weekly

Kate Sweeney, 8 July 2013

Aqdot is a young but diverse company requiring expertise in multiple fields including polymer chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, microfluidics, biological chemistry, chemical engineering, engineering, administration, sales and marketing.

The University of Cambridge Department of Chemistry spinout recently won the first RSC Emerging Technologies Competition for 2013. The event was organised by the Royal Society of Chemistry to identify and support research-intensive small enterprises and academics on the path to commercialise technology in chemical sciences with significant potential impact for the UK economy.

Microencapsulation is currently a multi-billion-per-annum industry with established applications in food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical, and personal care products. The current unmet consumer demand is to produce sustainable and inexpensive capsules that can be triggered to release bio-macromolecules.

To address this critical industry challenge over the next decades, Aqdot has developed an innovative technology to produce microcapsules with greatly simplified manufacturing procedure and unprecedented ability to encapsulate and release enzymes, antibodies and other high value materials.

Aqdot is building a prototype for the consumer products that will act as a demonstrator for the many other possible applications.

The full coverage can be found on Business Weekly.

Aqdot wins RSC Emerging Technologies Competition 2013

Aqdot has won the first RSC Emerging Technologies Competition for 2013.

The event was organised by the Royal Society of Chemistry to identify and support research-intensive small enterprises and academics on the path to commercialise technology in chemical sciences with significant potential impact for the UK economy.

Dr Jing Zhang and Dr Roger Coulston presented to a judging panel including private sector companies. The award was given to Aqdot based on merit and the potential impact of the technology. The prize will help Aqdot to work with industry partners and access further investment from members of the selection panel.

The prize was presented to Aqdot by Dr Robert Parker, RSC Chief Executive, and Rt Hon David Willetts MP, Minister for Universities and Science.

Aqdot wins NCourage Women Entrepreneur Award at Rice Business Plan Competition

Aqdot was also commended for having a woman cofounder and lead-presenter in the Rice Business Plan Competition to be awarded the Courageous Women Entrepreneur Award by the nCourage Entrepreneurs Investment Group.

nCourage Entrepreneurs Investment Group is judging The Rice Business Plan Competition and award Women Entrepreneur Award for Third Year.

The Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship will award a new $20,000 Award for Courageous Women Entrepreneurs at the 2013 Rice University Business Plan Competition.

The prize is sponsored by nCourage Entrepreneurs Investment Group consisting of: Cindy Boyd, President of Sentigy; Elizabeth Wiggins, Director, various community boards, Lamar Mathews, President of GP of Falcon Partners, Ltd. and Shelby Scarbrough, President, Practical Protocol. These four courageous entrepreneurs formed “nCourage Entrepreneurs” to invest in people, passion and their plan to execute. Other partners include Winnie Hart of TwinEngine, Sue Hrib of Signum Group, Suzy Ginzburg of Global Communications, and Dr. Lynn Kirkpatrick of Ensysce Bio Sciences. United by their passion to encourage the next generation of women entrepreneurs, and recognize the courage necessary to pursue an entrepreneurial journey, the nCourage team applauds the efforts of this year’s contestants.

Aqdot wins the Fifth Prize at 2013’s Rice Business Plan Competition

Aqdot was awarded the Fifth Prize Award at the Rice Business Plan Competition in Houston, Texas.

After being selected out of more than 400 entries world-wide to participate amongst the final 42 teams in the final round in Houston, Aqdot went through three rounds of pitches and Q&As to more than 150 venture and angel investors and was awarded the Fifth Prize Award (US$4000)  in tonight’s Gala Dinner.

Aqdot is the only non-US team in the final six this year.

The Venture Principal of Shell, Alexander Rozenfeld, presented the prize to the Aqdot team.

The Rice Business Plan Competition has been described as the Super Bowl and World Series, combined, by Fortune and CNN/Money. The world’s richest and largest business plan competition brought 42 top university teams from across the globe to pitch their new technology businesses to a record number of over 300 venture capital and investor judges. Judges evaluate the businesses based on the investment potential of the competitors’ new ventures.

More than 138 past competitors at the Rice Business Plan Competition have successfully launched their companies and are in business today or have had successful exits, and have raised more than $600 million in funding.

Aqdot wins CUE £1k Challenge

The second stage of Cambridge University Entrepreneurs‘ Business Creation Challenge has awarded 11 prizes of £1000 last night at the Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge. Aqdot is proud to announce that it has been awarded a prize in the technology stream.

The founder and CEO of Pavegen, Laurence Kemball-Cook, awarded the prize certificate to Aqdot, after a series of elevator pitches from the competition entrants to a crowd of students, investors, and local business community.

Aqdot wins CUE’s £100 for 100 Words Challenge

The first stage of the Cambridge University Entrepreneurs (CUE) £100 for 100 Words Challenge has ended and CUE was awarded £100 for its 100-word summary of the business idea.

Headed by Dr Roger Coulston, this is the Aqdot team’s first of the many awards to come.

“Microencapsulation is currently a multi-billion ($USD) a year industry with established applications in food, cosmetics, drug delivery, diagnostics, and electronic displays. The current unmet consumer demand is to produce inexpensive capsules that allow for the triggered release of a cargo. This is a critical industry challenge over the next decades. Aqdot has developed an economically viable method to produce capsules with the unprecedented ability to actively and passively release fragrances, enzymes, cells, and other high value materials. We are currently building a prototype for the consumer products industry that will act as a demonstrator for the many other possible applications.”

The rest of the interesting entries can be found on CUE’s website.

The Engineer: Team plans faster production of technology for drug delivery

The Engineer

Stephen Harris, 14 February 2012

Technology for more controlled drug delivery could be produced hundreds of times faster than with existing methods thanks to new research.

Scientists at Cambridge University have developed a faster process for manufacturing microcapsules — tiny spheres filled with drugs, pesticides or other substances — that also enables more precise control over when their contents are released.

The researchers have used microfluidics — where chemicals are combined in tiny sub-millimetre channels — to create droplets of a mixture that spontaneously assembles into capsules. These can then be broken down with light, heat or changes in pH.

‘Microfluidics has a very high frequency of generating those droplets and therefore capsules,’ PhD student Jing Zhang, lead author on the research, told The Engineer.

‘Currently I’ve only been doing a frequency of 300 to 3,000 droplets per second but it could go up to 100,000 droplets per second easily.’ Conventional methods produce around a couple of hundred microcapsules per second, she added.

Microcapsules are used to slowly release drugs inside the body, disperse pesticides over crops, add flavours or nutrients to food and even to release sealants in manufacturing processes.

The shell of the capsules either degrades over time or is broken down mechanically to release the contents. But the capsules produced through Cambridge’s method are more susceptible to other stimuli and so the release can be coordinated.

This could be particularly useful in manufacturing complex structures such as aircraft, where sealants usually need to be applied to parts one small area at a time to ensure a precise enough fit, said Zhang. ‘Potentially we could apply a signal and all the glue would be released in one go.’

The full report can be found in The Engineer.